Sysadmin day!

Sysadmin DayOh Heeeeeloooooooo! And, like every year, the last Friday of July is marked as SysAdmin day! Give a hug to your sysadmin, get him coffee, give him a smile! They work all year round to get everything up and running around the office, and they surely deserve it!

sysadmin unpacked the server for this website from its box, installed an operating system, patched it for security, made sure the power and air conditioning was working in the server room, monitored it for stability, set up the software, and kept backups in case anything went wrong. All to serve this webpage.

sysadmin installed the routers, laid the cables, configured the networks, set up the firewalls, and watched and guided the traffic for each hop of the network that runs over copper, fiber optic glass, and even the air itself to bring the Internet to your computer. All to make sure the webpage found its way from the server to your computer.

sysadmin makes sure your network connection is safe, secure, open, and working. A sysadmin makes sure your computer is working in a healthy way on a healthy network.

sysadmin takes backups to guard against disaster both human and otherwise, holds the gates against security threats and crackers, and keeps the printers going no matter how many copies of the tax code someone from Accounting prints out.

sysadmin worries about spam, viruses, spyware, but also power outages, fires and floods.

When the email server goes down at 2 AM on a Sunday, your sysadmin is paged, wakes up, and goes to work.

sysadmin is a professional, who plans, worries, hacks, fixes, pushes, advocates, protects and creates good computer networks, to get you your data, to help you do work — to bring the potential of computing ever closer to reality.

So if you can read this, thank your sysadmin — and know he or she is only one of dozens or possibly hundreds whose work brings you the email from your aunt on the West Coast, the instant message from your son at college, the free phone call from the friend in Australia, and this webpage.

Friday, July 26th, 2013, is the 14th annual System Administrator Appreciation Day. On this special international day, give your System Administrator something that shows that you truly appreciate their hard work and dedication. (All day Friday, 24 hours, your own local time-zone).

Let’s face it, System Administrators get no respect 364 days a year. This is the day that all fellow System Administrators across the globe, will be showered with expensive sports cars and large piles of cash in appreciation of their diligent work. But seriously, we are asking for a nice token gift and some public acknowledgement. It’s the least you could do.

Consider all the daunting tasks and long hours (weekends too.) Let’s be honest, sometimes we don’t know our System Administrators as well as they know us. Remember this is one day to recognize your System Administrator for their workplace contributions and to promote professional excellence. Thank them for all the things they do for you and your business.

Show your appreciation!

I used to be a sysadmin. 😀

The night before Christmas, in a sysadmins shoes

Twas the night before Christmas, when all through the house
Not a creature was stirring, not even a mouse.
The data was all safe, protected with care,
In hopes that year-end bonuses soon would be there.

The servers were nestled all safe in their racks
Protected from malware and vile forms of hacks.
The data all encrypted, with a nice complex key,
Christmas OrnamentThe software came, of course, with a great big huge fee.

Policy was written, compliance was done,
That had all been the exact opposite of fun.
Systems were patched, and locked one and all,
The team had done well, and they had stood tall.

Their audit was done, validation complete.
Their systems all ready, documentation all neat.
They had made it through ‘nother holiday season,
And were ready to cruise, it all stood to reason.

When from intrusion detection arose such a clatter,
The Admin sprang from his browser, watching Lohan get fatter.
Away to the consoles, he flew in a dash,
Checking faults and tripwire, computing their hash.

The light from the flat screens just made the place glow
The Admin then cursed, it could not be so.
Systems were crashing, the network was down,
It seemed almost like he was ready to drown.

College was easy, he got As and Bs,
These attacks were relentless,from overseas.
They seemed to be everywhere, attacks all at once,
They made him feel just like a big dunce.

His training took over, he set a grim face,
He quietly looked forward, to his happy place.
Cutting off systems, segmenting them away,
He was rolling right now, no time to play.

The pager just beeped and phones they did ring,
Event responders the noise then did bring.
Another server was hit, and suddenly dropped
The Denial of Service attack was not stopped.

The admin felt helpless, and just needed a lift,
Like something from Claus, please one early gift.
When, what his wondering eyes they did spy,
An extra program running, and then he knew why.
That’s when he knew, he just knew, oh of course

This had all started with just one Trojan Horse.
Prolly came to a user through his e-mail,
Policy and training, to no avail.

He marched through the servers, saw them as bots
Chuckling now, thinking “that’s all you gots?”
Malware from servers, each one did he cull,
Sending them one at a time right to dev/null.

Now he was rolling, and almost chuckling with glee,
He looked up with dismay, what did he see?
The retail server was hit, and crashing, amok,
He SSHed in, but could only say “rats”.

He saw very quickly that they now had root,
And hoped that he would not get the boot.
As he sat back in his chair, and reached for a Dew,
He knew the primary site was all through.

He knew then and there it would be a long night,
So he switched everything to the failover site.
Laying his cursor on that one little app,
He clicked only once and prod1 took a nap.

He sprang for his phone, to his team gave a twitter,
Failover was done, and he had not been a quitter.
The net was a mess, the farm had been bought,
But in the end, it had not been for naught.

The systems had done for what they’d been built,
They’d been prodded and poked, and finally said “tilt”.
He was glad it had not been a resume generating event.
His last thought for the night was for the attackers to get bent

His relief came too little, and seemed way too late,
He had pulled eves alone, and faced his sole fate.
He briefed the next crew, with all he did know
And went outside, to fresh fallen snow.

He sprang to his Honda, and cranked up the tunes,
Wishing for beach, and wind tossed sand dunes
He said as he drove down the road to the night,
Merry Christmas to all, and to all a good-night.

Credits go to securityweek.com, via Tibi.

Sysadmin Day!

And, like every year, the last Friday of July is marked as SysAdmin day! Give a hug to your sysadmin, get him coffee, give him a smile! They work all year round to get everything up and running around the office, and they surely deserve it!

sysadmin unpacked the server for this website from its box, installed an operating system, patched it for security, made sure the power and air conditioning was working in the server room, monitored it for stability, set up the software, and kept backups in case anything went wrong. All to serve this webpage.

sysadmin installed the routers, laid the cables, configured the networks, set up the firewalls, and watched and guided the traffic for each hop of the network that runs over copper, fiber optic glass, and even the air itself to bring the Internet to your computer. All to make sure the webpage found its way from the server to your computer.

sysadmin makes sure your network connection is safe, secure, open, and working. A sysadmin makes sure your computer is working in a healthy way on a healthy network.

sysadmin takes backups to guard against disaster both human and otherwise, holds the gates against security threats and crackers, and keeps the printers going no matter how many copies of the tax code someone from Accounting prints out.

sysadmin worries about spam, viruses, spyware, but also power outages, fires and floods.

When the email server goes down at 2 AM on a Sunday, your sysadmin is paged, wakes up, and goes to work.

sysadmin is a professional, who plans, worries, hacks, fixes, pushes, advocates, protects and creates good computer networks, to get you your data, to help you do work — to bring the potential of computing ever closer to reality.

So if you can read this, thank your sysadmin — and know he or she is only one of dozens or possibly hundreds whose work brings you the email from your aunt on the West Coast, the instant message from your son at college, the free phone call from the friend in Australia, and this webpage.

Friday, July 29th, 2011, is the 12th annual System Administrator Appreciation Day. On this special international day, give your System Administrator something that shows that you truly appreciate their hard work and dedication. (All day Friday, 24 hours, your own local time-zone).

Let’s face it, System Administrators get no respect 364 days a year. This is the day that all fellow System Administrators across the globe, will be showered with expensive sports cars and large piles of cash in appreciation of their diligent work. But seriously, we are asking for a nice token gift and some public acknowledgement. It’s the least you could do.

Consider all the daunting tasks and long hours (weekends too.) Let’s be honest, sometimes we don’t know our System Administrators as well as they know us. Remember this is one day to recognize your System Administrator for their workplace contributions and to promote professional excellence. Thank them for all the things they do for you and your business.

Show your appreciation!

I am a sysadmin.

System Administrator Appreciation Day

Sysadmin Day

Every year, last Friday of July is System Administrator Appreciation Day.

A sysadmin unpacked the server for this website from its box, installed an operating system, patched it for security, made sure the power and air conditioning was working in the server room, monitored it for stability, set up the software, and kept backups in case anything went wrong. All to serve this webpage.

A sysadmin installed the routers, laid the cables, configured the networks, set up the firewalls, and watched and guided the traffic for each hop of the network that runs over copper, fiber optic glass, and even the air itself to bring the Internet to your computer. All to make sure the webpage found its way from the server to your computer.

A sysadmin makes sure your network connection is safe, secure, open, and working. A sysadmin makes sure your computer is working in a healthy way on a healthy network.

A sysadmin takes backups to guard against disaster both human and otherwise, holds the gates against security threats and crackers, and keeps the printers going no matter how many copies of the tax code someone from Accounting prints out.

A sysadmin worries about spam, viruses, spyware, but also power outages, fires and floods.

When the email server goes down at 2 AM on a Sunday, your sysadmin is paged, wakes up, and goes to work.

A sysadmin is a professional, who plans, worries, hacks, fixes, pushes, advocates, protects and creates good computer networks, to get you your data, to help you do work — to bring the potential of computing ever closer to reality.

So if you can read this, thank your sysadmin — and know he or she is only one of dozens or possibly hundreds whose work brings you the email from your aunt on the West Coast, the instant message from your son at college, the free phone call from the friend in Australia, and this webpage.

Friday, July 30, 2010, is the 11th annual System Administrator Appreciation Day. On this special international day, give your System Administrator something that shows that you truly appreciate their hard work and dedication. (All day Friday, 24 hours, your own local time-zone).

Let’s face it, System Administrators get no respect 364 days a year. This is the day that all fellow System Administrators across the globe, will be showered with expensive sports cars and large piles of cash in appreciation of their diligent work. But seriously, we are asking for a nice token gift and some public acknowledgement. It’s the least you could do.

Consider all the daunting tasks and long hours (weekends too.) Let’s be honest, sometimes we don’t know our System Administrators as well as they know us. Remember this is one day to recognize your System Administrator for their workplace contributions and to promote professional excellence. Thank them for all the things they do for you and your business.

Show your appreciation!

I am a sysadmin.

Sysadmin Appreciation Day

Azi, ultima zi din iulie, e Sysadmin Appreciation Day. http://www.sysadminday.com Si pana la urma, e firesc nu? Avem ziua copiilor, ziua mamei, ziua femeii, ziua piratilor, ziua minerilor, deci de ce sa nu existe si Sysadmin day?!

Sa beti o bere pentru sysadminul vostru, si daca il scoateti la plimbare azi, sa ii cumparati o inghetata 😉

Eu o sa sarbatoresc diseara, in Le General la AGWA/Coca Leaf Party.

picture-42

Sysadmin manual

[Multumesc Trollii]

#include<hello.h>

SYSADMIN(1)                                           SYSADMIN(1) 

NAME 
       sysadmin  – responsible for everything imaginable that may 
       or may not have to do with the system you’re using.   Con- 
       traction of “system” and “administrator” 

SYNOPSIS 
       sysadmin [-ab] [-cd] [-ef] etc…… 

DESCRIPTION 
       sysadmin takes care of everything, is generally harangued, 
       must be supplied with coffee, chocolate,  and  alcohol  in 
       order  to  function  properly, cannot be exposed to direct 
       sunlight, and must not be allowed to have a life. 

       sysadmin is not intended  as  a  user  interface  routine; 
       other  programs provide user-friendly front ends; sysadmin 
       is used by everyone who can track him [her] down. 

       With no flags, sysadmin reads its standard input up to  an 
       EOF,  or  a  line which sysadmin wishes to parse, and then 
       proceeds to ignore it entirely and read news all day. When 
       invoked  with the -w option, sysadmin reads standard input 
       and responds according to terms of job description. 

OPTIONS 
       -bofh  Go into Bastard  Operator  From  Hell  mode.   This 
              option  causes  sysadmin to use tools stored in the 
              /usr/lib/bofh directory to parse the standard input 
              and route user tasks appropriately. 

       -cd    causes   sysadmin   to   become  caffeine-deprived, 
              resulting in system slowdowns. 

       -b     causes the sysadmin to function normally while aug- 
              menting  the  standard  input with beer(5).  Can be 
              used with the -t option  as  well,  depending  upon 
              which version of sysadmin you are running. 

       -t     causes  the  sysadmin  to  smoke tobacco, which can 
              result in significant performance improvement, pro- 
              vided you are running the correct version of sysad- 
              min. 

       -Cfile Specify an  alternate  configuration  file  (sysad- 
              min.cf is the standard). 

       -dX    set debuggin value to X. 

       -fFullname 
              Set the full name of the sysadmin

       -Bf    Create the sysadmin.cf configuration freeze file. 

       -lname Sets  the  name  of  the  “luser”  person (that is, 
              originator of a given request). -l can only be used 
              by “trusted” users (who are listed in sysadmin.cf). 

NOTES 
       The -t option should not be used with a version of  sysad- 
       min which is not capable of parsing tobacco input.  Though 
       the functionality of this command may seem similar to  the 
       -b  option,  it  should  not  be confused with that or the 
       related -c option.

Santa Claus, xboxes and hackers

Apparently, Santa Claus’s gmail account was hacked a while ago by some incredibly smart hackers who realized his password was something like “mrsclaus123” and thus, the legend has been both confirmed and demolished. 

The good news is that Santa does exist, but the bad news is that he’s not so jolly as one might have thought until now… Having discussions with Jesus, Satan, the “hottest elf magazine” and so on, he proves he is just an ordinary man with his little perks, gossips, and even a MOM!

I can say that I’m pretty dissapointed right about now, and I’m going to be a very very bad boy all this year, maybe I’ll get an XBox…

[via Meeku]

SysAdmin Day… A bit late

Well, on the 25th of July some of us celebrated the 9th SysAdmin Day, but I forgot!

Thanks to Aghi, I remembered and with a slight delay, I made sure to add it to my calendar, so next year I won’t miss it.

On the front page of the website dedicated to this event it states what a sysadmin is, and why you should thank us:

If you can read this, thank your sysadmin

A sysadmin unpacked the server for this website from its box, installed an operating system, patched it for security, made sure the power and air conditioning was working in the server room, monitored it for stability, set up the software, and kept backups in case anything went wrong. All to serve this webpage.

A sysadmin installed the routers, laid the cables, configured the networks, set up the firewalls, and watched and guided the traffic for each hop of the network that runs over copper, fiber optic glass, and even the air itself to bring the Internet to your computer. All to make sure the webpage found its way from the server to your computer.

A sysadmin makes sure your network connection is safe, secure, open, and working. A sysadmin makes sure your computer is working in a healthy way on a healthy network. A sysadmin takes backups to guard against disaster both human and otherwise, holds the gates against security threats and crackers, and keeps the printers going no matter how many copies of the tax code someone from Accounting prints out.

A sysadmin worries about spam, viruses, spyware, but also power outages, fires and floods.

When the email server goes down at 2 AM on a Sunday, your sysadmin is paged, wakes up, and goes to work.

A sysadmin is a professional, who plans, worries, hacks, fixes, pushes, advocates, protects and creates good computer networks, to get you your data, to help you do work — to bring the potential of computing ever closer to reality.

More about this day, and sysadmins on: http://www.sysadminday.com/

And a short sysadmin song, written by a sysadmin, performed by a sysadmin and brought to you by a sysadmin: